Deford discusses future of journalism

first_imgSports journalism is at the forefront of technological advances in the media world, Sports Illustrated Senior Writer Frank Deford said at the 2010 Red Smith Lecture in Journalism Wednesday night. In his lecture, entitled “Sportswriter is One Word,” Deford spoke of his experiences in the sports writing business and gave his take on where the industry is going.Deford started the lecture off by describing himself as a “hybrid,” as his work in the field of sports involves more than just news.“I know I’m a writer, but only part of me is a journalist,” he said. “Most of my pieces are storytelling rather than reporting.”Although he has been writing for Sports Illustrated since 1962, Deford said he never expected his job to last this long and only came about it by accident.“I never set out to be a sportswriter. I fell into it in college. I always think I’ll grow up and move out of it,” he said.Deford said while sportswriters seldom garner the respect for their field of work amongst their journalist peers, the area of writing they work in allows for an unmatched level of creativity.“Sports writing offers the most opportunity amongst journalistic disciplines for storytelling,” he said.For a long time, the area of American culture that sportswriters covered in addition to the job itself were stagnant in its progress, and this hindered growth of media opportunities for alternate forms of publication and women sportswriters, according to Deford.“In sports, everything played in exactly the same places as if it had been ordained that way,” he said.He said he was blessed to come into the field when it was undergoing rapid growth.“I was fortunate unlike Red [Smith’s] generation who had to chronicle a little realm,” Deford said. “I came into the enterprise when it was exploding.”Despite this increase of coverage, Deford said sports writing has lost a bit of its luster.“To be a sportswriter today isn’t nearly as engaging. The revolution is over,” he said.Part of that problem is the expansion of sports journalism to a new realm of media: the Internet.“Journalism as we know it began with the printing press,” Deford said. “It ended with the Internet.”Deford said as the focus of coverage shifts online, readers are losing the joy of being exposed to a variety of subjects by being able to pick and choose what they read.“The mainstream media says we’re going to give you a full arc of the goings on. Even if you weren’t going to read about education, you might bump into it,” he said, speaking of print media.“People in this century are growing up with a predilection to only read what interests them,” Deford said.Despite these issues, Deford feels that expansion of coverage can also be beneficial for sports writing.“When I was in college, Eisenhower warned about the military industrial complex. It really is the entertainment amusement complex. This is great for sportswriters,” he said.Deford said this evolution could be described by a word many old time sports writers tossed around — “bush” — which was used to describe anything that wasn’t deemed as worthy of reputable coverage, such as soccer.“Who cares that it is bush. It’s fun. The end of journalism as we know it is the beginning of new sports journalism,” he said.Deford said despite the expansion of coverage the Internet offers, we are losing a critical aspect of sports journalism: the storytelling.“Pitchers can only go six innings, readers can only go six sentences,” he said. “It is the good stories and good investigative journalism which we will lose.”last_img read more

Dining Hall adds low calorie options

first_imgNotre Dame Food Services worked this summer to add more low calorie and multicultural options to the dining hall menus, responding to student demand for healthier options. Marc Poklinkowski, general manager of South Dining Hall Food Services, said the changes were made directly in response to the student surveys that are completed at the end of each semester. “If I had to sum up what the four to five hundred students said on the survey, it’s, ‘OK, we need to get healthier.’ I think we’ve addressed a lot of those issues in the changes we made this year,” he said. One noticeable change to the dining hall menu is the addition of red pepper hummus, which Poklinkowski said has been extremely popular so far this year. He said that all of the hummus is made by the Food Service support facility right off campus. “There’s a possibility that we will make different types of specialty hummus in the future,” he said. Student body president Catherine Soler said student government, aware of how popular hummus is with students, worked to provide more flavor options. “One of our platform ideas was better hummus, and we expressed this to Notre Dame Food Services. We found out that they actually made hummus in the plant off campus, and that there were new opportunities available there,” she said. “In the end we decided on red pepper hummus.” Poklinkowski said a notable change is the addition of Greek and Indian cuisine. “The Pan-American station is turned to Greek food once every twelve days. We did that to break up the monotony,” he said. “All day we have gyros, spanakopita, pita chips, spicy feta, spicy Mediterranean relish, among other Greek foods.” Every 12 days, Indian cuisine will replace the homestyle line, Poklinkowski said. “We had quite a few people [on the survey] ask for Indian foods,” he said. “One of the managers at the dining hall is Indian, so he came up with some home recipes. The unit chef over at North worked with him to put [those recipes] into Notre Dame terms.” Tuesday is the first day South Dining Hall will serve Indian cuisine. Indian beef, chicken and vegetarian dishes will be offered, in addition to sides and rices. Poklinkowski said small changes have also been made to the salad line at South. “At the end of the salad line we are going to have a second variety salad, for example a buffalo chicken salad, a tomato walnut salad or a chicken Caesar, kind of like the ones that are prepared for lunch at North,” he said. “We are still figuring out the logistics … we don’t have the space to make them made-to-order.” Other changes this year, Poklinkowski said, include new Sunkist flavored waters, craisins at the end of the salad line and “skinny buns” (90-calorie pita buns) on the deli line. Tina Aalfs, operations manager of North Dining Hall Food Services, said North Dining Hall will integrate the Indian and Mediterranean cuisines into its menu after fall break. “We’re planning on running each concept four days at a time, so we’ll have Indian for four days, Mediterranean for four days and Mexican for four days.” For now, the biggest changes at North Dining Hall are apparent from the moment you walk in the building. “Physically, the building’s changed,” she said. “[Over the summer] they painted the walls and installed new carpeting.” While the new paint and carpet jobs are certainly cause for excitement, regular North Dining Hall-goers say they are ecstatic about the return of the spoons to their regular spot beside the forks and knives. “Last year, I accidentally would take two forks because they did not have spoons on the utensil tray,” junior Rebecca Huffer said. “It’s nice to get my utensils all in one place now.” Cereal enthusiasts who love to mix and match should be aware that five cereals provided last semester will go out of rotation by the end of September. “We keep our 15 heaviest used cereals, and the bottom five rotate out each year,” Poklinkowski said. “Rice Krispies, Apple Jacks, Cocoa Krispies, Rice Chex, Captain Crunch and Cheerios are the six that got voted out, so they will likely be gone in a month or so.”last_img read more

Jenkins receives 2011 Diversity Award

first_imgAccording to a University press release, University president Fr. John Jenkins was one of 14 individuals to receive a 2011 Champion of Diversity award from Indiana Minority Business Magazine (IMBM). Jenkins was recognized by the magazine at a Jan. 14 ceremony in Indianapolis. The magazine honored the award recipients as “leaders in their respective fields, not only because they excel at what they do, but also because they are inclusive,” according to Shannon Williams, president and general manager of IMBM. “This year’s esteemed group of awardees has promoted diversity with their hiring practices, outreach programs or have individually transcended racial or gender barriers,” she said. Jenkins, in his sixth year as University president, acted upon the recommendations of two University committees to enact initiatives designed to enhance support for a diverse faculty. These initiatives were based upon reports prepared by the University Committee on Cultural Diversity and the University Committee on Women Faculty and Students. Jenkins was recognized for the appointments of Don Pope-Davis, vice president, associate provost and professor of psychology, and Susan Ohmer, William T. and Helen Kuhn Carey Associate Professor of Modern Communication and assistant provost, to oversight roles for efforts related to faculty of color and women faculty, respectively. Their posts involve close coordination with deans, department chairs and others in faculty recruitment, hiring, retention, mentoring and development. The award also honored the creation of the Moreau Academic Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, which is a two-year research, teaching and mentoring initiative for scholars studying or representing diverse groups. Another initiative recognized by the magazine was the Dual Career Assistance Program, which assists the spouses of recently hired full-time faculty and staff find potential employment opportunities in the area or at Notre Dame. “The intellectual interchange that is essential to a university requires, and is enriched by, the presence and voices of diverse scholars and students,” Jenkins said last year. “Beyond the benefits diversity brings to all universities, we hold this commitment also because Notre Dame is a Catholic university.” Jenkins was elected president-elect of the University by the Board of Trustees on April 30, 2004, and became the University’s 17th president on July 1, 2005.last_img read more

Dyngus Day celebrations combine religion and politics

first_imgA day of indulgence takes over South Bend on Easter Monday, a celebration meant to both kick off the political season and mark the end of Lent. Polka music is played, kielbasa is eaten and Fr. Leonard Chrobot whips out his special multi-colored vest from Poland. Everybody is Polish on Dyngus Day. “After Lent, it’s kind of a release, so everybody does crazy things,” Chrobot, pastor of St. Patrick’s and St. Hedwig’s Catholic churches in South Bend, said. South Bend’s West Side Democratic and Civic Club will host the day’s primary event, which falls on April 9 this year. The club touts itself as the birthplace of Dyngus Day on its website. However, Dyngus celebrations date back more than a thousand years, commemorating the rise of Catholicism in Poland. Traditionally, Dyngus Day celebrations involved boys dousing girls with water and rapping their legs with pussy willow branches to show their affection. Participants in Poland would attend Easter Monday Mass, then go out and feast. Today in South Bend, the celebration is first and foremost centered on politics, not religion. However, Chrobot still plays an integral role in the day’s festivities, opening each year’s ceremony with a prayer. “I believe people should have days for celebration,” Chrobot said. “It’s certainly part of our Catholic tradition, and certainly part of our Polish tradition. The Polish have a saying … ‘You should be able to dance and pray the rosary with equal zest.’” South Bend celebrants often begin eating and drinking around 9 a.m., then gather to hear political speeches at the West Side Democratic and Civic Club at noon. Chrobot opens the ceremony with a Benedictionary prayer, then grabs a broom dipped in holy water to sprinkle attendees. He makes a point to hit the politicians and journalists, saying he wants to get rid of any devils in the room. “I sprinkle them with the waters that we bless on Holy Saturday to chase out any evil spirits,” Chrobot said. “When President Clinton was involved with the sex scandal, I took some holy water to there and I think it was … [then-Indiana Sen.] Evan Bayh, I think said, ‘We’ll need much more water to bless the White House than this.’” Chrobot also brings an Easter candle to the event and lights it, symbolically illuminating a world of darkness. After he opens the ceremony, candidates running for office are introduced. Governors and state officials attend, but the focus usually remains on those from northern Indiana and South Bend. Other local celebrities are introduced and praised. Chrobot said the club especially enjoys acknowledging those who make the West Side proud. “The West Side, it’s suffered a lot in the last 20 or 30 years, especially since the [1960s civil rights] riot. I mean, I grew up on the West Side, so I know it very well,” he said. “It was virtually all-Polish up until after the war. It was multi-ethnic, but the vast majority was Polish. “All the stores down Western Avenue were Polish bakeries, Polish beauty shops, clothiers, all kinds of Polish shops. All of those are gone now.” The West Side has a history of ethnic transition and tension, exemplified by the locations of the Irish St. Patrick’s parish founded in 1858 and the Polish St. Hedwig’s church built in 1877. Chrobot is pastor of both, and said their locations across the street from each other speak to a history of both pride and resentment. “When [the Polish] came to this country, that language was so much a part of their identity,” Chrobot said. “Much more so than the Irish, who spoke English … They built their own churches. There are five Polish parishes in the area. “There was antagonism between the [Polish and Irish]. The Irish looked down on the Poles because of the language. ‘Why don’t you speak English?’ ‘Well, because Polish is important to us.’ The separation, one priest used to refer to it as ‘the kielbasa curtain.’” After World War II, Chrobot said Polish Americans returned home to find housing limited. New developments opened but quickly filled, resulting in a migration to the suburbs.  African Americans moved in and the demographic of the West Side shifted. It is once again in flux as the Hispanic community grows in the area. A separation still exists between the various ethnicities around the city of South Bend. Chrobot said the West Side Democratic Club is shoulder-to-shoulder packed on Dyngus Day, but not usually with African Americans, who host their own event called “Solidarity Day.” Black clubs around the city open up and hold celebrations full of dancing. “I went to the Solidarity Club,” Chrobot said. “And I walked in and I said, ‘Am I welcome here?’ Because there was a guy at the door, and he said, ‘About as welcome as I am in Mishawaka.’” Chrobot said the comment was in jest, but there was truth to the sentiment. A folder sits in his office, stuffed with handwritten copies of Dyngus Day prayers. Usually, he said, they include words meant to relieve the ethnic tensions. “There have been a lot of racial issues over the years,” Chrobot said. “Many of my prayers address that issue.” A beacon of racial equality, presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy once made a stop at South Bend’s Dyngus Day, putting it on the national map. The Easter Monday celebration became known for its politics and the day is now commonly associated with the Democratic Party of South Bend.,There is no St. Dyngus. But South Bend celebrates Dyngus Day the way the Irish observe St. Patrick’s Day, with crowds drawn to bars, restaurants and clubs for ethnic food, music and plenty of liquid refreshment. Former St. Joseph County Democratic Chairman Owen D. “Butch” Morgan said South Bend’s Dyngus Day celebration on Easter Monday has been an opportunity for community members to meet candidates for local, state and national political offices since the 1930s. “It allowed people who may not have access to the candidates an opportunity to [do so] now that they were going to be here at the [West Side Democratic and Civic] Club,” Morgan said. “I’m sure that the Club wasn’t the only place to have it, but if people wanted a chance to get out and see face-to-face the people that were running for office, then this was a chance to do that. It also gave a chance for people to wear buttons and show support for the candidates.” Tim Hudak, president of the West Side Democratic and Civic Club, said Dyngus Day began as a Polish tradition to celebrate Easter Monday. Boys used to hit girls’ legs with pussy willow branches and splash water on them as ways of flirting. “It was supposed to be fun, too … but it wasn’t fun for the girls, I guess,” Hudak said. “Here in the 1930s, we were having a little conflict with getting voters to the poll, and we decided there’s got to be some way how we can make this happen.” Hudak said the Club’s staff decided to add political significance to Dyngus Day by inviting politicians to the Club to meet and speak to voters. More than eight decades later, political candidates still visit the Club and other South Bend establishments on Dyngus Day to promote their platforms, Morgan said. He said the Club sells Polish food like kielbasa, as well as alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages to attendees. Sophomore Kim Halstead, a South Bend native, said although she has never visited the Club on Dyngus Day, her Polish-American family celebrates the occasion like an extension of Easter. “My mom’s side of the family is entirely Polish, so essentially all we do is eat more food,” Halstead said. “We always have a Polish-food Easter, with mashed potatoes and sausages and cabbage and green beans and other things. And we get dessert of paczkis from a Polish bakery downtown. Essentially for us, Dyngus Day is Easter’s second life.” Morgan said candidates post campaign signs on the first floor of the Club, where they speak on Dyngus Day, as early as the morning of Good Friday. On the day of the event, he said most of the candidates and the media arrive at the Club around 11 a.m., but some arrive much earlier. “One thing that’s really important is around 5 in the morning, some candidates and some media show up to watch Tim [Hudak] and the rest of his staff cook the food,” Morgan said.   The political candidates speak on a small stage in front of a mural illustrating a 19th century Dyngus Day celebration. The Polish word “solidarnosc,” meaning “solidarity,” is inscribed at the top of the painting. “We’re ‘solidarity’ on get out to vote,” Hudak said. “That’s our connection to ‘solidarnosc.’” Morgan said political candidates know they will find the biggest Dyngus Day crowd in South Bend at the Club between 11 a.m. and 1:30 or 2 p.m. “It’s just gospel,” he said. “There are 20 or 30 places in St. [Joseph] County that have really good Dyngus Day activities, but the mecca is right here.” In the early 1970s, South Bend’s African-American community created Solidarity Day to interface with the Polish-American community, Morgan said. He said Solidarity Day is celebrated primarily at the South Bend Elks Lodge and is a different name for the same concept as Dyngus Day. “It celebrates our diversity as a community and the fact that the black community works very hard with the rest of the community to promote good government and good candidates, and it has been a very big success since it started,” Morgan said. Morgan said representatives from Hillary Clinton’s and Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns, including former President Bill Clinton and his daughter Chelsea, came to the Club on Dyngus Day in 2008 while the candidates battled in Indiana’s Democratic primary. Several members of the Kennedy family also visited, some to support Clinton and others to support Obama. “That particular Dyngus Day was a madhouse,” he said. “It gave a lot of publicity to the Club, but because of the Secret Service, it narrowed down the traffic that was coming through in buying food. It was great to have them here as far as building on the reputation and the aura of the Club, but that year we got hurt revenue-wise.” Morgan said former U.S. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy visited the Club on Dyngus Day in 1968 when he was seeking the Democratic presidential nomination. “That crowd was unmatched,” Morgan said. “They always have a great crowd here, but that was just something totally different.” Robert Kennedy was assassinated shortly after midnight June 5, 1968, less than two months after visiting the Club and less than one month after winning Indiana’s Democratic primary election. This year, Morgan said gubernatorial candidate John Gregg, senatorial candidate Joe Donnelly and congressional candidate Brendan Mullen will be among the speakers at the April 9 event. “While Dyngus Day is several months away from the fall [elections], you can start building momentum on Dyngus Day for the fall,” Morgan said. “It really serves multiple purposes for candidates to be here at the West Side.” Morgan said Indiana’s right-to-work law, which Gov. Mitch Daniels signed in February, will be an important topic at this year’s Dyngus Day events. The law bans unions from collecting mandatory fees for representation. “It’ll be like a ‘Remember the Alamo’ type thing,” Morgan said. “That’s how passionate the Democrats are to help enough people undo that law.” Morgan said Republican political candidates can come to the Club on Dyngus Day if they pay the regular entrance fee. “But this is the West Side Democratic Club,” he said. “They do not get access to the microphone … They don’t go up on stage and speak … They don’t put up signs.” Dyngus Day is an opportunity to celebrate Christianity and give community members a chance to learn about candidates for political office, Morgan said. “The Republicans usually have something at their headquarters,” he said. “Republicans and Democrats alike can get out and mingle with hundreds and thousands of voters … And I think economically for a lot of places, it’s a third or half of their budget that they can put together for the year.”last_img read more

Students network at full-time career fair

first_imgSeniors seeking full-time employment, and maybe some free water bottles and pens, descended on the Joyce Center and Heritage Hall on Wednesday afternoon for the full-time employment session of the 2012 Fall Career Expo, sponsored by the Career Center. Senior Brett Cavanaugh, a political science major, said the Career Fair was the first step in his job search. “I’m not sure what I want to do next year and I thought this would be a good place to start my search,” he said. “I picked 10 companies that I was interested in … mostly just Arts and Letters companies I liked, [such as] Target, Abercrombie, General Mills, Boston Consulting Group and Finish Line.” Cavanaugh said this year’s career fair was an improvement on last winter’s event. “That fair [last winter] was a little overwhelming, but I got more comfortable as the night progressed, so I feel pretty good tonight,” he said. Cavanaugh said he spent about an hour researching the companies he wanted to speak with at the fair. “I looked at their websites to see what their objectives are, what they stand for,” he said. “I just want to see what’s out there and get my feet in the water, start networking.” Senior Audrey Hayes, a double major in philosophy and violin performance, said she was at the fair to explore her options. “I’m thinking perhaps a path in consulting or graduate school or teaching English in a foreign country,” she said. Hayes said she searched for companies that fit into those three categories in her pre-event research. “[I wanted to see] what their statements are, how they operate,” she said, “[I picked] the ones I thought were the best fit for me.” Her goal for her conversations with recruiters was to focus on her abilities in the workplace, she said. “I would like to reiterate I’m a hard worker and I’m passionate about the things that I do,” Hayes said. “I want to show that [my skills] translate into any kind of field.” Senior Rory Convery, a history major, is a native of Ireland but is looking for a job in the U.S. “I don’t want to leave the country … I need a visa,” he said. “I’m looking at a lot of consulting firms and financial services. I’m considering law school, but consulting I feel is something I could do for two or three years.” Convery said he spoke to friends who worked at companies he liked to get a better picture of their office environment. “I really liked Acquity Group,” he said. “They seemed like a really young, dynamic company, and I know from friends they have a nice working atmosphere.” Convery said he appreciated Acquity Group’s digital strategy for marketing. “It’s cutting edge and helping companies break into the market through the Internet,” he said. Convery said the next step after the fair was about following through with the contacts he made there. “Hopefully I’ll get some interviews and move on from there,” he said. Senior Mike Georgiadis, a chemical engineering major, said he had pragmatic reasons for being at the fair. “I’ve got to work,” he said. “I’m keeping my options open. I’m looking at consulting today, [and will] probably look at engineering companies next week at the Engineering Career Fair.” Georgiadis said he secured an internship thanks to last year’s fair. “[The internship] went well, [but it’s] not really what I want to do with the rest of my life,” he said. “I was working at Hatch, an engineering company. I was looking at power plants and trying to upgrade to reduce their emissions for the EPA rule that’s come out recently.” Junior Lissa Stolte said she got an email from the company she worked at last summer to visit their booth at the Career Fair. She said she was able to speak with the recruiter about her project for McGladrey, a mid-sized accounting firm, this semester. “I’m actually leading an SIBC project for that firm this semester and we talked about that a little bit,” Stolte said. Even though she is a junior, she said the recruiters personally invited her to stop by and say hello. “It was nice to have them reach out because it’s usually the other way around,” she said. “I updated the main recruiter about what I’m up to and gave her my revised resume.” Tonight the center will host its first Internship Fair at the Joyce Center.last_img read more

Saint Mary’s announces 12th president

first_imgSouth Bend native Jan Cervelli was introduced to the Saint Mary’s community Wednesday afternoon as the 12th president of the College.Cervelli said she grew up across the St. Joseph River and it has been a “wonderful homecoming” to be back in the community.Caitlyn Jordan | The Observer “God has taken me on so many great journeys, and he brought me back here for the greatest purpose of all,” she said.Cervelli said she is not the only one thrilled to be back home; her mother, a resident of Granger, said she is happy to have Jan back in the area. Cervelli said she has been running into classmates and neighbors since she has been back and has received a tremendous amount of support from the community.Cervelli attended Holy Cross grade school and Saint Joseph High School in South Bend. Her sister, Patricia, is a Saint Mary’s alumna and member of the class of 1972. Cervelli chose Purdue because of her interest in architecture, though she would have liked to attend Saint Mary’s, she said.“I’ve always appreciated the seamlessness about spirituality and subjects taught [in Holy Cross education],” she said. “The spiritual dimension gives much more meaning and depth to the education.”Coming from a background of larger universities, Cervelli is leaving a position as dean of the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture and professor of landscape architecture at the University of Arizona.She said the smaller school atmosphere is exciting because of the sense of intimacy, the strong connection to students and she cited the 10:1 student-to-professor ratio at the College as a testament to how Saint Mary’s fully engages students in the classroom.She also said her experience in landscape architecture, which is taught in a small studio settings, lends itself well to her understanding of how learning happens in a more intimate setting.Prior to her work at the University of Arizona, Cervelli served as the first female dean at Clemson University when she was selected as its dean of the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities, according to a College press release.  She has also served as associate dean for Undergraduate Studies and director of the Teaching and Learning Center at the University of Kentucky.Cervelli said she recognizes the importance of interdisciplinary connections that can be made to make the educational environment even richer at the College.She said her first priorities as president of the College are getting to know the staff, faculty and students.“I want to be able to have strong conversations and spend time understanding from the student perspective,” she said. “I like to call it a listening tour.”Additionally, Cervelli said she wantd to immerse herself into student life at the College.“I want to become a part of the class of 2020,” she said. “ … I want to be able to walk the walk with students and see what it’s like to take classes, to live in the dorm, to eat the food.”Her next priority is to get to know the alumnae around the country, Cervelli said.“Saint Mary’s has fabulous alumnae, who are super accomplished and well connected, so I’m looking forward to getting to know people and allowing people to get to know me,” she said.Cervelli plans to build on the partnerships with Holy Cross institutions including Notre Dame and Holy Cross and to invite the community at large to campus in a highly visible way, she said.“Saint Mary’s is so modest,” she said. “It’s a real strength and a wonderful quality; on the same token, [we] need to brag a little bit more, so I’d like to work with the staff here to look at how we can make our mark on the world and share our accomplishments.”Cervelli hopes to help create a more sustainable campus using her professional background and expertise.“I’m very interested in looking at the campus itself, as a landscape architect and how can we begin to design, redesign and look to the future of development that makes the campus sustainable,” she said.She said many students are interested in issues of sustainability today and she believes the leadership of the students could help to guide that discussion.Cervelli said she will bring a few pets to South Bend from Arizona and looks forward to reconnecting with her childhood friends. Emphasizing the importance of balance in her life, Cervelli cited some of her interests outside of her academic career.“I have been in rock bands since I was in high school,” Cervelli said. “I had the chance to join a band and tour in college, but I knew that my parents wouldn’t be very happy.”Although she most often performed as a singer, Cervelli said she can also play guitar and the keyboard.She said she gave up music between graduate school and her career as a professor and dean but later picked up the hobby again.“When I got to Arizona, one of the faculty in Architecture heard that I used to do music … so we got together with some graduate students, played guitar and jammed. We put together a band that would play at events for the University and other events in downtown Tucson.”Cervelli while she derives a sense of balance from music, she places value on all activities that provide it to students.“The wellness of students is important to me,” she said, and the renovation of Angela Athletic Facility will be crucial to that wellness and helping students to live a balanced lifestyle.Cervelli said her passion for students, music and wellness will dovetail nicely into her role as the president.“It’s in college where you begin to learn that balance,” she said. “All leaders should demonstrate how to live that balance.”She will also institute an open door policy when she takes office, June 1.“I want students to know that I have an open door,” Cervelli said. “I will drop what I have to because I know that if a student is coming, then it’s important.”Tags: Jan Cervelli, Janice Cervelli, new president, saint mary’slast_img read more

Annual ceremony honors ROTC students

first_imgArmy, Navy and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) units gathered on South Quad Wednesday afternoon to participate in the annual Pass in Review, a symbolic display of skill, precision and patriotism. The ceremony included a benediction by director of Campus Ministry Fr. Peter Rocca, the presentation of student awards and a speech from University President Fr. John Jenkins. Rosie LoVoi | The Observer Reserve Office Training Corps (ROTC) students gathered Wednesday afternoon for the Pass-in-Review ceremony on South Quad.Rocca gave an opening prayer of thanksgiving for the “cadets and midshipmen who wish to serve our country and make the world a better place.”“We are grateful as well for the blessings of scholarship and of learning, of faith and of service,” Rocca said.University president Fr. John Jenkins gave a speech at the ceremony praising the ROTC men and women for their dedication, both to Notre Dame and their country.“I want to congratulate warmly all the award winners,” Jenkins said. “But I want to congratulate each and every member of Notre Dame ROTC. In addition to the demanding course of studies that each of you undertake, you also have too the responsibilities of Notre Dame ROTC.”Jenkins said this year was momentous for Notre Dame ROTC because it was the Navy’s 75th anniversary on campus. He said the Navy’s presence began in 1941, when Notre Dame was a training center for the Navy during World War II.  Jenkins also said it was the 65th anniversary of Army ROTC and mentioned also that Air Force began in 1947.“These are proud milestones, but as was said earlier, the officer training goes back even further to the days of Father Sorin,” Jenkins said.Jenkins talked about the variety of military training on campus. He said with the outbreak of World War I many members of the Notre Dame community displayed their loyalty by serving in the military.“The names of those who died in that conflict … are immortalized in the East Door of the Basilica. And over that east door is the motto ‘God, Country, Notre Dame.’“But as we all know, it has almost become a motto for Notre Dame for what we espouse, for what we consider important, for a sense of service, a sense of sacrifice,” Jenkins said.Jenkins said the spirit of Notre Dame ROTC embodies the Notre Dame spirit in general.“I just ask you to always remember the values you learn at Notre Dame. As you go forth into military service and even beyond that; a sense of leadership, a sense of community, a sense of looking out for one another and a sense of self-sacrifice for something greater in your lives.”Jenkins said General Martin Dempsey, 18th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, will be speaking at Commencement and noted that he is an exemplary figure of leadership and service.He said he commends members of the ROTC for being trained as sailors and soldiers of not only great skill, but also enlightened consciences.“You have contemplated the morality of warfare and embraced the virtues of peace,” Jenkins said. “Highest among these virtues stand courage, justice, faith, hope and love. These values will serve you in your future.”Jenkins finished his speech by thanking the military men and women for representing Notre Dame in the best way possible.“Wherever you go, we ask you to bring Notre Dame with you, bring that spirit with you,” he said. “We hope that this spirit, which has infused so many generations of Notre Dame graduates, will be part of your lives as well.”Tags: Air Force ROTC, Army ROTC, Father John Jenkins, navy ROTC, Pass in Reviewlast_img read more

Justice Friday discusses US Homeless Veterans

first_imgAs Sept. 11 approached, this week’s Justice Friday installment, presented by Saint Mary’s junior and Justice Education Social Relations Officer Alex Shambery, served as a way to promote social awareness for Homeless U.S. Veterans.Shambery began by sharing statistics she found through the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans (NCHV) website.“Eleven percent of homeless adults are veterans,” she said. “Of those 11 percent, 51 percent have disabilities and 50 percent have serious mental illnesses. Seventy percent have substance abuse which ties into mental illness issues.”In the bigger picture, Shambery said 1.4 million veterans are at risk of living in poverty.“About 40,000 veterans are homeless on any given night,” she said. “America’s homeless veterans have been in World War II, the Korean War, The Cold War and Vietnam.”According to Shambery, one-third of the veterans who are homeless were directly in these war zones, although she added these numbers are approximations.“There’s no way of getting a very specific number,” she said. “It’s usually based on average and information they get from homeless shelters.”All of these statistics raises the question as to why these veterans are homeless. Shambery said the main reason is due to a lack of support.“Mainly because of an extreme shortage in affordable housing and a lack of family and social support,” she said. “You train to go over there and dedicate your life to try and save your country and then you come back and people tell you that your experience won’t help you find a job in America.”Saint Mary’s junior Alex Morales said she recently talked to someone who found himself in a similar situation after being deployed.“He said it almost felt like what would happen if you would die,” Morales said. “He said you lose all of those connections. It’s a weird gray area. I think it just spirals from there.”Justice Education president and senior Caylin McCallick agreed with Morales.“The training in the military isn’t necessarily transferring,” McCallick said. “When I was in ROTC, one of my military instructors was a captain in the army. He was an army ranger, but he couldn’t get a job better than working in a factory.”Shambery said it is the duty of students to reach out through volunteering at homeless shelters. In South Bend specifically she suggested the Center for the Homeless and the Robert L. Miller Senior Veterans Center.“A lot of people think the government is going to take care of it, but it’s all of our issues,” Shambery said. “Make a donation. If you can’t make a financial donation you can always donate your time. They’re going overseas to fight for us. An hour a week is nothing compared to what they’ve done for us.”Justice Education vice president and senior Katie Dwyer said spreading awareness among the community is key in helping the veterans.“I think it’s out of sight out of mind,” Dwyer said. “I think the first thing we should do is spread more awareness about it.”“[Veterans]need basic physical health care, counseling, job assessment, training, placement and assistance,” Shambery said. “But a top priority is a secure, safe, and supportive environment free of drugs and alcohol.”Justice Education secretary and junior Morgan Matthews said students can help give veterans part of the supportive environment they need by merely spending some time with them.“They are coming from a life style that is hectic,” Matthews said. “Then they come to a life of boredom in comparison.”“I think that’s where we as students should come in,” Shambery said. “We’re not family members, but we can provide that support for them — at least the social support aspect.”“I think also what needs to be established is veteran-on-veteran support,” Matthews said. “You can sit with a veteran for as long as you want and try to understand, but I think in some cases it might not be enough compared to veteran on veteran.”Since 2005, Shambery said the number of homeless veterans has been reduced by 70 percent since 2005, but she emphasized that this is not good enough.“We need to get all our homeless vets off the street,” Shamberry said.Tags: Justice Fridays, Saint Mary’s College, Veteranslast_img read more

Saint Mary’s names new hall director

first_imgTags: dorm life, McCandless Hall, saint mary’s, Trelstad Alyssa Trelstad became an honorary belle when she joined the Saint Mary’s Residence Life staff as the hall director for McCandless Hall.“I think that all the people that make up Saint Mary’s make it special,” Trelstad said of her new workplace and home. “The students, staff, and faculty create a community unlike any other.”The hall directors live in their dorm buildings and act as a resource for their residents, according to Trelstad. Trelstad said McCandless Hall presents unique challenges to the hall director as it is a first-year only dorm, but for her, this makes the job even more exciting.“I am excited for the opportunity to impact the lives of the first-year students,” Trelstad said. “I would argue that the first year of college brings about a concentrated period of growth and development for students. For most, it is the first time they are living away from home. For many, it is their first experience living with peers. Finding a way to foster growth, allow for mistakes, and advocate for positive decision making will be a challenge.”Prior to coming to Saint Mary’s, Trelstad earned a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. She is currently completing a Master’s in School Counseling and Mental Health Counseling at Indiana University South Bend, she said. Trelstad believes her experience as a community advisor at the University of Minnesota prepared her well for her new job as a hall director.“Residence life is a unique opportunity to know students beyond the classroom,” she said. “The residential life piece of a college experience teaches students life skills like responsibility, independence, organization and empathy. Being able to watch residents flourish, especially first-year residents, is a privilege.”Trelstad found out about the hall director position from a current student while working together.“This summer I worked at Starbucks with a Saint Mary’s student,” Trelstad said. “She told me about it and I applied that night.”Trelstad’s other job experiences also include living in residential settings. She interned and worked in the science faculty at boarding schools, she said. Most recently, Trelstad worked at La Lumiere in La Porte, where she taught Anatomy and Physiology, coached rowing and worked in the dorm, Trelstad said.As hall director, Trelstad works with the resident advisors, ministry assistant and “Belles Connect” assistants to foster a community within the dorm, she said. She said she is excited to work and grow close with her staff, and believes they will make the first-years’ experience an excellent one.“The mission of Saint Mary’s College describes a residential community where women are prepared to make a difference,” Trelstad said. “To engage these young women with one another, provide a life-long support system and engage each belle to be her very best for herself. I am excited to see the creativity and dedication that the McCandless staff has already demonstrated blossom to make this the best year yet.”last_img read more

Journalist shares research on press safety in Mexico

first_imgKatherine Corcoran, a Kellogg Institute for International Studies Hewlett fellow for public policy, spoke at the Hesburgh Center for International Studies on Tuesday about why an increasing number of journalists are being murdered in Mexico, even as the country is becoming more democratic. Mexico is now one of the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists, Corcoran said — she knows this firsthand. Corcoran worked in the Associated Press’ Mexico bureau as an enterprise editor overseeing features and special investigations, and then as its bureau chief. She interacted with other journalists who were later killed, allegedly for doing their jobs, she said. “Mexico is not a country at war,” Corcoran said. “The shocking thing to me was that so many journalists were being killed in a democracy.” After a year researching this issue as a Kellogg fellow, Corcoran concluded that three factors have contributed to the high number of journalist murders in recent years: impunity, weak government institutions and the relationship between drug cartels and political figures. Corcoran noted that government statistics say 99.6 percent of aggressions against journalists (i.e. equipment seizure, threats, assaults, murders) go unprosecuted. “Impunity is a huge problem,” Corcoran said. “So the reason you kill a journalist in Mexico is because you can.”Impunity is the result of weak government institutions, she said. “Everyone says Mexico is a democracy, but anybody who really knows Mexico will say that Mexico never had a full transition to a democracy,“ Corcoran said. “What people there now call it is an electoral plurality — but the institutions never did the full transformation and they remain very weak.”Mexico’s transition to democracy has also brought a redistribution of power to state and local governments, Corcoran commented, which has encouraged more relationships between drug cartels and political figures. Sometimes journalists are killed by drug cartels for the cartels’ own reasons, but Corcoran said most of the time journalists are killed by cartel members on behalf of political officials. However, those cases are also the most difficult to prove. “The closer the case is to the government, the less [of a] chance [there is] that it will be investigated, and the more [of a] chance [there is] that they will try to blame narcos or some other entity for killing the journalist,” Corcoran said. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists’ website, 44 journalists have been killed in Mexico since 1994 in cases in which there was a confirmed motive tied to the journalist’s work and an additional 53 have been killed without a confirmed motive. “People say, ‘Why are all these journalists being killed in Mexico every year?’ And everybody says it’s the narcos,” Corcoran said. However, she said, in reality the highest number of aggressions against journalists are the work of public officials or some other representative of the government.Corcoran said between 2009 and 2017, 273 of 2,765 total aggressions were committed by organized crime, but 1,352 were committed by public officials. She also noted that according to the Mexican government’s own statistics, 42% of aggressions — not just murders — against journalists were committed by public officials. Overall, aggression against journalists has been increasing every year since 2009, she said, but there are small groups of journalists who are beginning to fight back.“There was no investigative reporting of any merit before in Mexico,” Corcoran said. Recently, however, she said a small group of reporters has begun to investigate corruption in Mexico while training younger journalists to do so as well.“Even though it’s a small movement, it is a movement,” Corcoran said.Tags: Democracy, journalist, Katherine Corcoran, Mexico, Mexico journalistslast_img read more