Saint Mary’s announces 12th president

first_imgSouth Bend native Jan Cervelli was introduced to the Saint Mary’s community Wednesday afternoon as the 12th president of the College.Cervelli said she grew up across the St. Joseph River and it has been a “wonderful homecoming” to be back in the community.Caitlyn Jordan | The Observer “God has taken me on so many great journeys, and he brought me back here for the greatest purpose of all,” she said.Cervelli said she is not the only one thrilled to be back home; her mother, a resident of Granger, said she is happy to have Jan back in the area. Cervelli said she has been running into classmates and neighbors since she has been back and has received a tremendous amount of support from the community.Cervelli attended Holy Cross grade school and Saint Joseph High School in South Bend. Her sister, Patricia, is a Saint Mary’s alumna and member of the class of 1972. Cervelli chose Purdue because of her interest in architecture, though she would have liked to attend Saint Mary’s, she said.“I’ve always appreciated the seamlessness about spirituality and subjects taught [in Holy Cross education],” she said. “The spiritual dimension gives much more meaning and depth to the education.”Coming from a background of larger universities, Cervelli is leaving a position as dean of the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture and professor of landscape architecture at the University of Arizona.She said the smaller school atmosphere is exciting because of the sense of intimacy, the strong connection to students and she cited the 10:1 student-to-professor ratio at the College as a testament to how Saint Mary’s fully engages students in the classroom.She also said her experience in landscape architecture, which is taught in a small studio settings, lends itself well to her understanding of how learning happens in a more intimate setting.Prior to her work at the University of Arizona, Cervelli served as the first female dean at Clemson University when she was selected as its dean of the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities, according to a College press release.  She has also served as associate dean for Undergraduate Studies and director of the Teaching and Learning Center at the University of Kentucky.Cervelli said she recognizes the importance of interdisciplinary connections that can be made to make the educational environment even richer at the College.She said her first priorities as president of the College are getting to know the staff, faculty and students.“I want to be able to have strong conversations and spend time understanding from the student perspective,” she said. “I like to call it a listening tour.”Additionally, Cervelli said she wantd to immerse herself into student life at the College.“I want to become a part of the class of 2020,” she said. “ … I want to be able to walk the walk with students and see what it’s like to take classes, to live in the dorm, to eat the food.”Her next priority is to get to know the alumnae around the country, Cervelli said.“Saint Mary’s has fabulous alumnae, who are super accomplished and well connected, so I’m looking forward to getting to know people and allowing people to get to know me,” she said.Cervelli plans to build on the partnerships with Holy Cross institutions including Notre Dame and Holy Cross and to invite the community at large to campus in a highly visible way, she said.“Saint Mary’s is so modest,” she said. “It’s a real strength and a wonderful quality; on the same token, [we] need to brag a little bit more, so I’d like to work with the staff here to look at how we can make our mark on the world and share our accomplishments.”Cervelli hopes to help create a more sustainable campus using her professional background and expertise.“I’m very interested in looking at the campus itself, as a landscape architect and how can we begin to design, redesign and look to the future of development that makes the campus sustainable,” she said.She said many students are interested in issues of sustainability today and she believes the leadership of the students could help to guide that discussion.Cervelli said she will bring a few pets to South Bend from Arizona and looks forward to reconnecting with her childhood friends. Emphasizing the importance of balance in her life, Cervelli cited some of her interests outside of her academic career.“I have been in rock bands since I was in high school,” Cervelli said. “I had the chance to join a band and tour in college, but I knew that my parents wouldn’t be very happy.”Although she most often performed as a singer, Cervelli said she can also play guitar and the keyboard.She said she gave up music between graduate school and her career as a professor and dean but later picked up the hobby again.“When I got to Arizona, one of the faculty in Architecture heard that I used to do music … so we got together with some graduate students, played guitar and jammed. We put together a band that would play at events for the University and other events in downtown Tucson.”Cervelli while she derives a sense of balance from music, she places value on all activities that provide it to students.“The wellness of students is important to me,” she said, and the renovation of Angela Athletic Facility will be crucial to that wellness and helping students to live a balanced lifestyle.Cervelli said her passion for students, music and wellness will dovetail nicely into her role as the president.“It’s in college where you begin to learn that balance,” she said. “All leaders should demonstrate how to live that balance.”She will also institute an open door policy when she takes office, June 1.“I want students to know that I have an open door,” Cervelli said. “I will drop what I have to because I know that if a student is coming, then it’s important.”Tags: Jan Cervelli, Janice Cervelli, new president, saint mary’slast_img read more

BP strengthens in-house team with hires from PPF, Aon Hewitt

first_imgSmart joined in June from consultancy Aon Hewitt, which he joined in December 2012 as senior researcher for bond managers.Prior to that, he spent nearly three years as managing director at Switzerland’s Helvetica WMP.However, Smart spent the majority of his career at Lazard Asset Management, leaving Invesco in 1995 for his new role.Prior to his departure in 2009, he was the firm’s UK head of fixed income.Sara also joined in June, after nearly five years at the PPF as principal fund manager, in charge of asset allocation and investment strategy.In June, he told IPE the lifeboat fund would look into building its funded hedging strategy following concerns over the price of derivatives trades.Prior to joining the PPF, Sara spent more than nine years at HSBC Global Asset Management, starting his career at WestLB Asset Management in 1994.BP IM declined to comment on either appointment.Both appointments come after Sally Bridgeland resigned as chief executive of the fund.Bridgeland, who had been chief executive of BP Pension Trustees for nearly seven years, left in April and has since confirmed she will join Dutch outsourcing advisers Avida International.The fund slightly underperformed its 15% benchmark in 2013 – the last full year under Bridgeland’s tenure – returning 14.7%. BP’s £19bn (€22.7bn) pension fund has increased its in-house capacity, hiring new heads of fixed income and investment strategy.BP Investment Management (BP IM) has named Ian Smart as head of fixed income and the Pension Protection Fund’s (PPF) Opkar Sara as head of investment strategy.In his new role, Smart will be responsible for more than £3.3bn in fixed income holdings, spread across the fund’s £2.6bn fixed interest and £469m index-linked bond portfolio.It holds a further £201m in UK fixed income as part of its pooled investments.last_img read more

ACC’s coronavirus guidelines for competition, testing and more

first_img Published on July 29, 2020 at 8:00 pm Contact Roshan: rferna04@syr.edu | @Roshan_f16 Comments The Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.The Atlantic Coast Conference’s Medical Advisory Group released a seven-page coronavirus report Wednesday outlining guidelines and information regarding testing, masks, quarantining and discontinuing games.The group, composed of 15 medical and athletic experts, created “minimum standards (to) provide guidance on appropriate risk mitigation strategies and engender a level of trust and confidence,” the report states. Because the guidelines are the “minimum,” the ACC acknowledged that stricter local or state rules may apply. For now, however, the 15 ACC schools and any nonconference opponents are expected to abide by these regulations as of Aug. 1.Here’s a breakdown of the report:AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCOVID-19 testing and positive resultsAll football team members — including players, coaching staff, trainers, administrative assistants and academic support providers — must be tested for COVID-19 within three days of every game, beginning the week of the first game. The guidelines also apply to team members of Olympic sports, as well as those in “close contact” with them. The report deemed five of Syracuse’s seven ACC-sponsored fall sports, as well as lacrosse and basketball, to be at “high-risk,” of spreading COVID-19. Players in these sports must undergo weekly testing. The exception to the weekly testing is cross country, which is listed in the report as “medium-risk.” Those athletes can be tested every other week. Low-risk athletes, like golf or tennis players, should be tested at the discretion of the institution. Additional testing and contact tracing should also be conducted at the institution’s discretion. Athletes identified through contact tracing should quarantine for 14 days, the ACC’s report states.If a student-athlete tests positive for COVID-19, they’ll isolate for at least 10 days from the detection of symptoms or the return of the positive test result. The athlete must also have recovered for at least one day. The team’s medical staff will decide when the athlete can return to play. Within 24 hours of a positive test result, the team is expected to notify all opponents who have come within six feet of the player for more than 15 minutes in the previous 48 hours. Benches, sidelines and locker roomsEveryone in the bench area, including coaches, bench players, trainers and players who have just exited the game, is expected to wear a mask. Football and men’s lacrosse are the only exceptions. Those players are wearing helmets on the sidelines, and face shields are being developed to reduce the spread of respiratory droplets for football, according to the ACC report. Temperature checks, six-foot distancing and masks are required for any individual on the sidelines. Each school’s staff will be responsible for disinfecting home and visiting locker rooms, as well as bench areas. Visiting teams will also get additional time to conduct further sanitation at their discretion. Other informationFootball officials should also abide by three-day testing requirement.Postgame interaction should be limited between players, staff and coaches.Except officials and players, anyone handling equipment should be screened and should wear gloves and a mask.Campus-wide outbreaks, an inability to control and isolate positive COVID-19 cases or insufficient hospitalization in case of a surge could all lead to “game discontinuation.”Pregame or postgame routines that violate six-foot social distancing should be eliminated.Travel groups for teams should be evaluated to minimize risk of exposure.Teams should be aware of the mental health of student-athletes, especially as it pertains to COVID-19 changes.center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more