What Are Town Boards Committees Talking About Week of October 7 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — According to the Wilmington Town Clerk’s calendar, below are the town and school board, committee and commission meeting scheduled for the week of Sunday, October 7, 2018.Sunday, October 7No MeetingsMonday, October 8No Meetings — Offices ClosedTuesday, October 9The Wilmington Board of Selectmen meets at 7pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. An Executive Session (closed to the public) at 6pm precedes the public portion meeting. Read the agenda HERE.The Reading Municipal Light Department’s Citizens Advisory Board meets at 6:30pm in North Reading’s Town Hall. Read the agenda HERE.The Wilmington Historical Commission meets at 7pm at the Wilmington Town Museum. Read the agenda HERE.Wednesday, October 10The Wilmington Board of Registrars meets at 11am in the Town Hall’s Small Conference Room. Read the agenda HERE.The Wilmington School Committee meets at 7pm in the High School’s Large Instruction Room. Read the agenda HERE.Thursday, October 11No MeetingsFriday, October 12No MeetingsSaturday, October 13No MeetingsAll meetings are open to the public unless noted.(NOTE: While unlikely, it is possible additional meetings could be added to this week’s calendar on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday.  It’s best to check the Town Clerk’s calendar mid-week.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWhat Are Town Boards & Committees Talking About? (Week of September 1, 2019)In “Government”What Are Town Boards & Committees Talking About? (Week of August 4, 2019)In “Government”What Are Town Boards & Committees Talking About? (Week of July 7, 2019)In “Government”last_img read more

Housewife electrocuted in Satkhira

first_imgA housewife died from electrocution at Kadakati village in Ashashuni upazila on Friday. Quoting local people, Shahidul Islam Shahin, officer-in-charge of Ashashuni Police Station, said Moina Khatun, 28, wife of Afaz Uddin, came in contact with live electric wire while cleaning a refrigerator with a wet cloth in the morning, leaving her dead on the spot. Police recovered the body and sent it to local hospital morgue.last_img

India mob kills two men over suspected cow theft

first_imgTwo Muslim men were beaten to death by stick-wielding Indian villagers who suspected them of stealing cows, police said Monday, the latest such attack over the animal Hindus consider sacred.Police in northeastern Assam state’s Nagaon district said they had registered a murder case over the deaths of Abu Hanifa and Riyazuddin Ali on Sunday. Two suspects have been detained for questioning.”They were chased and beaten with sticks by villagers who said the two boys were trying to steal cows from their grazing field,” Debaraj Upadhyay, Nagaon’s top cop, told AFP by telephone.”By the time we took them to the hospital at night they had succumbed to their injuries,” he added.Footage shot by local onlookers and aired by Indian broadcasters Monday showed the two badly beaten victims cowering with their hands tied as villagers surrounded them.The incident comes amidst a wave of rising tensions over the killing and smuggling of cows in Hindu-majority India, where the animal is considered sacred and its slaughter is a punishable offence in many states.There have been a spate of attacks in recent months by ‘cow protection’ vigilante groups, who roam highways inspecting livestock trucks for any trace of the animal.Last month a Muslim man was beaten to death by a mob in Rajasthan state after they discovered cows in his truck. The man was a dairy farmer transporting milk cows.In both that incident and Sunday’s mob beating police were accused of failing to act quickly enough to protect the victims.In the Rajasthan attack, in which 200 vigilantes set upon trucks transport cattle along a highway, police first arrested 11 of those beaten for alleged permit violations instead of rounding up the perpetrators.Upadhyay rejected suggestions that police had reacted too slowly to Sunday’s incident, saying his officers rescued the pair and rushed them to a hospital, where they later died.He also dismissed speculation that a vigilante group or association was involved in the attack.Critics say vigilantes have been emboldened by the election in 2014 of prime minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party.Last year Modi criticised the cow protection vigilantes and urged a crackdown against groups using religion as a cover for committing crimes.At least 10 Muslim men have been killed in similar incidents across the country by Hindu mobs on suspicion of eating beef or smuggling cows in the last two years.Most Indian states have banned cow slaughter and imposed heavy penalties and jail terms on offenders, while the transportation of cattle across state lines is also barred in several jurisdictions.In a renewed effort to protect against cow smuggling, the government plans to issue millions of cows with unique identification numbers linked to a national database.last_img read more

Attorney Generals Selective Silence Deafens Senate Russia Inquiry

first_imgBrendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty ImagesAttorney General Jeff Sessions testifies during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday.Jeff Sessions did exactly what he needed to do Tuesday — help himself in the eyes of his boss, President Trump, and, in turn, help Trump.But the attorney general, an early Trump supporter, revealed little in the congressional hearing about the ongoing Russia saga or Trump’s role in possibly trying to quash the investigation looking into it.Using vague legal justification, Sessions shut down potentially important lines of investigative questioning — and that may be exactly how the White House wants it.Sessions showed flashes of anger rarely seen from the 70-year-old Alabamian, calling any suggestion that he colluded with Russia to interfere in the U.S. presidential election a “detestable lie.”The tactic — combined with the earlier testimony of high-ranking Trump administration officials, who also deemed it inappropriate to divulge conversations with the president — may have given a road map for the White House to keep its secrets without the public-relations blowback of invoking executive privilege.Sessions wanted this open hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee so he could respond to fired FBI Director James Comey. Comey — a man whom, it was revealed Tuesday, Sessions wanted gone before Day 1 — intimated in testimony last week that Sessions’ potential conflicts went deeper than were originally known.Sessions denied all of it and shielded his boss from any potential damage.Silence is golden?It became obvious from the get-go Tuesday that Sessions would not disclose conversations between himself and the president. That cut off lines of inquiry about the exact circumstances surrounding Comey’s firing, what may have happened in the Feb. 14 Oval Office meeting in which Sessions was asked to leave so Trump could speak one-on-one with Comey, as well as Trump’s reaction to Sessions’ recusal.Sessions’ legal rationale for his silence was muddled, at best, and deliberate interference at worst, something Democrats accused him of.“My understanding is that you took an oath,” said New Mexico Democrat Martin Heinrich in some of the sharpest questioning of the day. “You raised your right hand here today, and you said that you would solemnly tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. And now you’re not answering questions. You’re impeding this investigation.”Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon was even more blunt. “I believe the American people have had it with stonewalling,” he said.Sessions shot back: “I am not stonewalling. I am following the historic policies of the Department of Justice. You don’t walk into hearing or committee meeting and reveal confidential communications with the president of the United States, who is entitled to receive conventional communications in your best judgment about a host of issues, and have to be accused of stonewalling them.”Sessions did not invoke “executive privilege.” As he acknowledged to Heinrich, “I’m not able to invoke executive privilege. That’s the president’s prerogative.”And yet, he told Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., who asked if Sessions could “speak more frankly” in a closed session with senators, as Comey did: “I’m not sure. The executive privilege is not waived by going in camera or in closed session.”Sessions repeatedly clung to vague reasoning for not answering many of the senators’ questions. He could not point to specific Justice Department language, even though Sessions said he had consulted with department attorneys before the hearing.Senators got just five minutes each to ask questions (the chairman and vice chairman got 10). When Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., asked about Sessions’ recollection of meetings with Russian officials or businessmen, he complained, “I’m not able to be rushed this fast. It makes me nervous.”When Republican Chairman Richard Burr of North Carolina interjected and noted that “the senator’s time has expired,” a wide grin swept across Sessions’ face, as he looked up at the chairman and former colleague.Round and round it went. And all of it probably made Sessions’ boss very happy.“He thought that Attorney General Sessions did a very good job,” White House deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters, including NPR’s Tamara Keith, traveling on Air Force One on Tuesday night. She added that Sessions “in particular was very strong on the point that there was no collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.”Can’t recallSessions’ silence kept a lid on important details that could have illuminated much more of the Russia story. He said he couldn’t “recall” 18 times. It reminded Washington of another attorney general who testified 10 years ago, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales. Gonzales said that he couldn’t “recall” some 60 times in a hearing about the dismissal of federal prosecutors, accusations of coordination with the White House and overall Justice Department leadership.Ironically, Sessions was one of the senators questioning Gonzales that day and expressed frustration with Gonzales’ faulty memory.“Well, I guess I’m concerned about your recollection, really, because it’s not that long ago,” Sessions said. “It was an important issue. And that’s troubling to me, I’ve got to tell you.”Other attorneys general, of course, have evaded congressional questions. Eric Holder, President Barack Obama’s attorney general, was held in contempt of Congress for invoking executive privilege and not turning over documents related to the “Fast and Furious” investigation.But if questions coming into Tuesday’s hearing were, “How would Sessions respond to fired FBI Director James Comey’s intimation that there was something else — something classified — about Sessions to be concerned about?” or “What more do we know about President Trump’s role in firing Comey or putting pressure on officials to drop the Russia investigation?” there wasn’t much light shed on them.Having it in for Comey from the beginningWhat was learned, though, was that Sessions and Rod Rosenstein, now deputy attorney general, may have always been looking for a reason to fire Comey — and so was Trump.Sessions revealed that he and Rosenstein discussed before they were even confirmed getting rid of Comey. They wanted a “fresh start,” Sessions said.But Comey was kept on for months after they were both confirmed. And, like Trump, Sessions didn’t exactly criticize Comey’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation during the presidential campaign. When Comey came forward saying he was reopening the investigation in October of last year, Sessions praised him.“Now, he’s received new evidence,” Sessions said on Fox Business. “He had an absolute duty, in my opinion, 11 days or not, to come forward with the new information that he has and let the American people know that, too.”He added that Comey, after being uncomfortable with the airplane meeting between former Attorney General Loretta Lynch and former President Bill Clinton, had “stepped up and done what his duty is, I think.”Sessions was critical of the investigation, but seemingly only because it didn’t “get to the bottom” of what happened.“I think it should have used a grand jury,” he said. Sessions wanted people put under oath. “So you have to grill them, and people will surprise you how sometimes they’ll just spill the beans when they’re under oath like that.” He then pointed out that with the “new evidence,” Sessions thought the investigation was “back on track again.”All that seems to undermine the rationale for Comey’s firing that Sessions says he relied on — Rosenstein’s memo that charged Comey acted inappropriately in the handling of the Clinton email investigation.It wasn’t until the stars aligned, as the Russia investigation was heating up, that Sessions and Rosenstein could pull the plug, with at least Trump’s blessing. Sessions also admitted that neither he nor Rosenstein, Comey’s direct supervisor, ever talked to Comey about his job performance.And Trump himself undercut the reasoning for firing Comey that Sessions and Rosenstein had presented, saying he was going to fire Comey anyway “regardless of recommendation.”In Mueller’s courtThe questions will continue, especially of everyone who steps before Congress, but Trump allies have proved that even going under oath won’t shed light on the full details surrounding the Russia investigation and whether Trump pressured high-ranking officials to drop it.That is something that may have to be determined by Special Counsel Robert Mueller when he eventually releases his findings.And Trump allies have already been trying to insulate themselves and the president by attempting to delegitimize whatever Mueller comes up with.The irony, of course, is that if the president has done nothing wrong, as he has insisted all along, Mueller is the one guy in Washington who has the credibility to clear him.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

MIT lab developing ion microthrusters for cubesats

first_imgLozano holds a prototype of a microthruster, developed to propel small satellites in space. Credit: Bryce Vickmark © 2013 Phys.org Explore further For most of their still relatively short history, satellites have been extremely expensive ventures, both to design and build and to launch into space. With the miniaturization of electronics, however, scientists see a way to reduce the costs associated with sending craft into orbit, and also for sending them into outer space—cubesats—satellites that are tiny versions of the older models. They range in size from a shoebox to a Rubix cube. The current versions are sent aloft (sans engine) as part of a cargo load carrying other bigger equipment and remain orbiting the planet for a short time, till gravity pulls them back down. To get more out of their investment, scientists would like to put an engine on the little satellites so that they could stay in orbit, or even be sent to other parts of the solar system. Current research has centered around plasma or colloid thrusters. The researchers at MIT believe that ion thrusters are the better bet. Their idea is to use solar power to generate a charge to electrify a very small amount of liquid propellant—releasing an ion stream through a nozzle—generating just enough thrust to change the course of a cubesat or push it forward. Four of the thrusters would be sufficient to provide both attitude control and propulsion.Scientists believe it might be possible in the near future to send an entire fleet of cubesats into space for the amount of money it currently takes to send just one. In addition to designing tiny engines for them, engineers have also been hard at work designing other components necessary for fully utilizing such a satellite—one such example is the recently developed (also at MIT) inflatable antennae that greatly extends their range. Some suggest cubesats may even provide the long-sought solution to cleaning up space junk. Paulo Lozano. Credit: Bryce Vickmark (Phys.org) —The MIT News Office is reporting that the University’s Space Power and Propulsion Laboratory (headed by Paulo Lozano) is seeing progress with micro-sized thruster design to power the next generation of self-propelled cubsats. Because traditional combustion or electric engines don’t scale down well, the team has been testing ion electrospray thrusters that can be made as small as a postage stamp. Kickstarting tiny satellites into interplanetary space (w/ Video) Citation: MIT lab developing ion microthrusters for cubesats (2013, October 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-mit-lab-ion-microthrusters-cubesats.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researchers predict global warming will cause an increase in frequency of Indian

first_img Citation: Researchers predict global warming will cause an increase in frequency of Indian Ocean Dipole events (2014, June 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-global-frequency-indian-ocean-dipole.html (Phys.org) —A team of researchers, led by Wenju Cai of CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, in Australia has published a paper in the journal Nature in which they report that 21 out of 23 climate models they ran indicated an increased frequency of Indian Ocean Dipole events over the next century. The increase, the team also reports, will be due to the continuation of global warming. Explore further Positive Indian Ocean Dipole events cause devastating floods in many vulnerable east Africa countries. The 1997 positive Indian Ocean Dipole event resulted in several thousand deaths and displaced hundreds of thousands of people. The latest generation of climate models project that these extreme events are to occur more often under greenhouse warming. This image depicts the Gash River flooding in Kassala, Eastern Sudan, 2007. Credit: MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH/REUTERS This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Indian Ocean Dipole events are atmospheric phenomena that occur due to ocean temperature differences. They are characterized by peak sea surface temperature swings between the eastern and western basins. Positive phases of the cycle occur when warmer waters in the west lead to more rainfall there and cooler waters in the east lead to less rainfall. When this happens, land areas in the east such as Australia and Indonesia tend to undergo draughts, while those in the west such as parts of Africa undergo flooding. One example occurred in 1997 when smoke from fires in Indonesia blackened the skies across the region even as thousands of people were killed due to flooding in several African nations. In their paper, the authors of this new study suggest such occurrences are likely to happen much more often over the next several decades.To come to their conclusions, the team examined 31 global climate models and determined that 23 of them were capable of modeling rainfall in the Indian Ocean during both normal times and when there is a dipole event occurring. They ran the models first for the period 1900, to 1999 to see how well they could predict dipole events that actually occurred, then, encouraged by the results, ran the models again, this time for the period 2000 to 2099, under what they describe as business as usual conditions. They report that 21 of 23 models predicted an increase in the frequency of positive phase Indian Ocean Dipole events—the combined average predictions suggest the region will see approximately triple the number of such events over the coming century—from one every 17.3 years to one every 6.3 years. The business as usual conditions assume greenhouse gas emissions will continue to increase at their current pace.If such predictions come to pass it could mean an increase in fires in eastern countries, but more devastating perhaps, an increase in flooding in some of the poorest parts of the world, which would likely be made even worse in coastal areas as sea levels are predicted to rise during the same time period.center_img Journal information: Nature Indian Ocean phenomenon helping to predict extreme weather More information: Increased frequency of extreme Indian Ocean Dipole events due to greenhouse warming, Nature 510, 254–258 (12 June 2014) DOI: 10.1038/nature13327AbstractThe Indian Ocean dipole is a prominent mode of coupled ocean–atmosphere variability, affecting the lives of millions of people in Indian Ocean rim countries. In its positive phase, sea surface temperatures are lower than normal off the Sumatra–Java coast, but higher in the western tropical Indian Ocean. During the extreme positive-IOD (pIOD) events of 1961, 1994 and 1997, the eastern cooling strengthened and extended westward along the equatorial Indian Ocean through strong reversal of both the mean westerly winds and the associated eastward-flowing upper ocean currents1, 2. This created anomalously dry conditions from the eastern to the central Indian Ocean along the Equator and atmospheric convergence farther west, leading to catastrophic floods in eastern tropical African countries13, 14 but devastating droughts in eastern Indian Ocean rim countries. Despite these serious consequences, the response of pIOD events to greenhouse warming is unknown. Here, using an ensemble of climate models forced by a scenario of high greenhouse gas emissions (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), we project that the frequency of extreme pIOD events will increase by almost a factor of three, from one event every 17.3 years over the twentieth century to one event every 6.3 years over the twenty-first century. We find that a mean state change—with weakening of both equatorial westerly winds and eastward oceanic currents in association with a faster warming in the western than the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean—facilitates more frequent occurrences of wind and oceanic current reversal. This leads to more frequent extreme pIOD events, suggesting an increasing frequency of extreme climate and weather events in regions affected by the pIOD. © 2014 Phys.orglast_img read more