Vancouver man linked to murder suspect pleads guilty to BG burglary

first_imgA 23-year-old Vancouver man pleaded guilty today to burglarizing a Battle Ground home Sept. 24 and trafficking stolen property.Samuel A. Scory will be sentenced April 12 by Clark County Superior Court Judge Daniel Stahnke.Scory and Kirk M. Hernandez Sr., 42, who is accused of murdering Matthew Clark on Oct. 1, were allegedly accomplices in the burglary. Guns stolen in the burglary were allegedly the cause of a dispute that prompted Clark’s murder, according to court documents.They stole numerous firearms, night vision goggles, a sheriff’s badge and other items from the home, according to the documents.Scory also was accused of burglaries Sept. 19 in Vancouver and Oct. 16 in Camas. The Camas burglary made national news because of a quick-thinking 10-year-old girl who was inside the home at the time and called 911.Scory didn’t plead guilty to those crimes but would have been put on trial for them, had he not struck a plea bargain.He pleaded guilty to trafficking a Taurus .357 revolver, the same kind of gun stolen in the Sept. 19 Vancouver burglary.His attorney, George Marlton, said Scory made an “Alford” plea, which means he believes he is not guilty but acknowledges that the prosecution has evidence that could convict him in a trial and is pleading guilty to avoid a higher sentence.last_img read more

OBITUARY Cesino B Chet Perella 86

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Cesino  B. “Chet” Perella, 86, of Wilmington, formerly of Jeffersonville, IN and North Reading, died at his home on April 17, 2018. He was the beloved husband of the late Jeana “Charlene” (Doan) Perella, who died this past September.Born in Boston, MA on May 21, 1931. He was the son of the late Ludovico and Alsa (Gerosina) Perella. He was raised in Medford and was a graduate of Medford High School. Chet was a U.S. Air Force Veteran of the Korean War, he was an Airman First Class and served from 1950 to 1954.Chet was a chef and caterer for many years, he owned and operated Perella’s Cold Cut Center and Perella’s Catering, he also worked for Lombardo’s, Shriner’s Hospital for Children, Houghton Mufflin and Wang. He was a member of the North Reading Masonic Lodge and a Life member of the Lawrence United Masonic Lodge, he was also a member of the Shriner’s and the North Reading Moose Lodge.Chet was a fun loving person, who loved to travel with family and friends. He volunteered extensively for the Shriner’s and Mason organizations. He loved college football, cooking and volunteering many hours umpiring for the North Reading Men’s Softball League and the North Reading Little League.Family members include his loving children, Pamela Lewis and her husband Jerry,  Louie Perella and his wife Doreen, James Perella and his wife Kathy and Sherri White and her husband Steven;  brother, Ludovico Perella and his wife Mary and sister, Gina Vozzella; brother-in-law, James Doan and his wife Elaine ; six grandchildren, Kurt Jones and his wife Breanne, Eric Jones, Jenelle Braga and her husband Brian, Lou E. Perella and his wife Laura, Kyle White and Ethan White; 6 great grandchildren, Nate, Preston, Norah, Riley, Kailey and Lucy.His funeral will be held at the Croswell Funeral Home, 19 Bow Street, North Reading on Monday, April 23 at 10:30 AM. Calling hours will be held on Sunday, April 22 from 2 to 6 PM. Burial will be in Riverside Cemetery in North Reading. Memorial donations may be made in his memory to: Shriner’s Hospital for Children, 51 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114.Cesino  B. “Chet” Perella(NOTE: The above obituary is from Croswell Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: James Thayer Hastings, 84In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Thomas F. Connolly, 86In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: John “Jack” Tannian, Jr., 89In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Natalia Fileva One of Russias richest women and S7 Airlines coowner killed

first_imgNatalia FilevaTwitter [Representational Image]The co-owner and chairwoman of Russia’s S7 airlines legally known as PJSC Siberia Airlines, Natalia Fileva died in a private jet crash along with two others near Frankfurt in Germany on Sunday, March 31.The incident took place while the six-seater single-engine jet named The Epic-LT, en route Egelsbach airport from France crashed in a field while landing near the airport. The pilot and another Russian have been reported to be dead along with Fileva.According to the police, the aircraft was completely gutted due to the high impact of the crash. While the investigations are going on over the incident by the Russian and International authorities, the cause of the crash is yet to be ascertained.The private jet was flying from Cannes in France and disappeared from radars at 1322 GMT, according to data from a flight tracker Flighradar24, reports Reuters. The crashed private jet in which Natalia Fileva was flyingttwitterRussian and international authorities would investigate the crash and there was no information yet on what caused it, according to the airline, which is the main competitor of Russia’s No.1 carrier Aeroflot, adds the report.According to the DPA news agency, a police car racing to the crash site collided with another vehicle near the airport, killing two people inside the car and seriously injuring three police officers.The 55-year-old Fileva was a major shareholder of the second largest airline in the country with an estimated wealth of 600 million dollars. Her husband Vladislav Filev is the Chief Executive Officer of the S7 airlines.Founded in 1957 as the Tolmachevo united squadron, S7 airlines is the main competitor in Russia to Aeroflot. It has 96 aircraft that fly to 181 cities and towns in 26 countries.last_img read more

India mob kills two men over suspected cow theft

first_imgTwo Muslim men were beaten to death by stick-wielding Indian villagers who suspected them of stealing cows, police said Monday, the latest such attack over the animal Hindus consider sacred.Police in northeastern Assam state’s Nagaon district said they had registered a murder case over the deaths of Abu Hanifa and Riyazuddin Ali on Sunday. Two suspects have been detained for questioning.”They were chased and beaten with sticks by villagers who said the two boys were trying to steal cows from their grazing field,” Debaraj Upadhyay, Nagaon’s top cop, told AFP by telephone.”By the time we took them to the hospital at night they had succumbed to their injuries,” he added.Footage shot by local onlookers and aired by Indian broadcasters Monday showed the two badly beaten victims cowering with their hands tied as villagers surrounded them.The incident comes amidst a wave of rising tensions over the killing and smuggling of cows in Hindu-majority India, where the animal is considered sacred and its slaughter is a punishable offence in many states.There have been a spate of attacks in recent months by ‘cow protection’ vigilante groups, who roam highways inspecting livestock trucks for any trace of the animal.Last month a Muslim man was beaten to death by a mob in Rajasthan state after they discovered cows in his truck. The man was a dairy farmer transporting milk cows.In both that incident and Sunday’s mob beating police were accused of failing to act quickly enough to protect the victims.In the Rajasthan attack, in which 200 vigilantes set upon trucks transport cattle along a highway, police first arrested 11 of those beaten for alleged permit violations instead of rounding up the perpetrators.Upadhyay rejected suggestions that police had reacted too slowly to Sunday’s incident, saying his officers rescued the pair and rushed them to a hospital, where they later died.He also dismissed speculation that a vigilante group or association was involved in the attack.Critics say vigilantes have been emboldened by the election in 2014 of prime minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party.Last year Modi criticised the cow protection vigilantes and urged a crackdown against groups using religion as a cover for committing crimes.At least 10 Muslim men have been killed in similar incidents across the country by Hindu mobs on suspicion of eating beef or smuggling cows in the last two years.Most Indian states have banned cow slaughter and imposed heavy penalties and jail terms on offenders, while the transportation of cattle across state lines is also barred in several jurisdictions.In a renewed effort to protect against cow smuggling, the government plans to issue millions of cows with unique identification numbers linked to a national database.last_img read more

Pope avoids using Rohingya in Myanmar address

first_imgPope poses with Aung San Suu Kyi during a meeting at the presidential residence in Naypyidaw on 28 November 2017. Photo: ReutersPope Francis on Tuesday urged the leaders of majority-Buddhist Myanmar, mired in a crisis over the fate of Muslim Rohingya people, to commit themselves to justice, human rights and respect for “each ethnic group and its identity”.The pope avoided a diplomatic backlash by not using the highly charged term “Rohingya” in his addresses to officials, including leader Aung San Suu Kyi.However, his words were applicable to members of the beleaguered minority, who Myanmar does not recognise as citizens or as members of a distinct ethnic group.More than 620,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh – where the pope heads on Thursday – since the end of August, escaping from a military crackdown that Washington has said included “horrendous atrocities” aimed at “ethnic cleansing”.Francis made his comments in Naypyitaw, the country’s capital, where he was received by Suu Kyi, the Nobel peace laureate and champion of democracy who has faced international criticism for expressing doubts about the reports of rights abuses against the Rohingya and failing to condemn the military.”The future of Myanmar must be peace, a peace based on respect for the dignity and rights of each member of society, respect for each ethnic group and its identity, respect for the rule of law, and respect for a democratic order that enables each individual and every group – none excluded – to offer its legitimate contribution to the common good,” he said.Myanmar rejects the term “Rohingya” and its use, with most people instead referring to the Muslim minority in Rakhine state as illegal migrants from neighbouring Bangladesh.The pope had used the word Rohingya in two appeals from the Vatican this year.But before the diplomatically risky trip, the pope’s own advisers recommended that he not use it in Myanmar, lest he set off a diplomatic incident that could turn the country’s military and government against minority Christians.Human rights groups such as Amnesty International, which has accused the army of “crimes against humanity”, had urged him to utter it.A hardline group of Buddhist monks warned on Monday – without elaborating – that there would be “a response” if he spoke openly about the Rohingya.RELIGIOUS DIFFERENCES “A FORCE FOR UNITY”Richard Horsey, a former U.N. official and analyst based in Yangon, said the pope’s speech was “very cautiously worded” and “crafted to avoid antagonising local audiences”.”He has clearly taken the advice of his cardinals to avoid weighing in too heavily on the Rohingya crisis, but he certainly alludes to it with a message in his speech on some of the specific points that he makes,” Horsey said.Vatican sources say some in the Holy See believe the trip was decided too hastily after full diplomatic ties were established in May during a visit by Suu Kyi.The pope met privately with Suu Kyi at the presidential palace in this sparsely populated town that became the capital in 2006, and then they both made public addresses at a conference centre.Suu Kyi said in her speech that there had been an erosion of trust and understanding between communities of Rakhine state, but did not refer to the Rohingya.Francis, speaking in Italian, said that as it emerged from nearly 50 years of military rule, Myanmar needed to heal the wounds of the past.He called for a “just, reconciled and inclusive social order”, adding that “the arduous process of peacebuilding and national reconciliation can only advance through a commitment to justice and respect for human rights”.Myanmar’s army, whose leaders the pope met on Monday, has been battling various autonomy-seeking ethnic minority guerrillas for decades.The military has denied the accusations of murder, rape, torture and forced displacement of the Rohingya that have been made against it.The Rohingya exodus from Rakhine state began after Aug. 25, when Rohingya militants attacked security posts and the Myanmar army launched a counter-offensive.Referring to the country’s communal tensions, Francis said religious differences “need not be a source of division and distrust, but rather a force for unity, forgiveness, tolerance and wise nation-building”.He made the same point at an earlier meeting with leaders of the Buddhist, Islamic, Hindu, Jewish and Christian faiths in Yangon, where he called for “unity in diversity”.Aye Lwin, a prominent Muslim leader who was at the interfaith meeting, told Reuters he had asked the pope to appeal to Myanmar’s political leaders “to rescue the religion that we cherish, which could be hijacked by a hidden agenda”.Only about 700,000 of Myanmar’s 51 million people are Roman Catholic. Thousands of them have travelled from far and wide to see him and more than 150,000 people have registered for a mass that Francis will say in Yangon on Wednesday.Francis is expected to meet a group of Rohingya refugees in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, on the second leg of his trip.last_img read more